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While some of us are ” larks” and are at our best in the early mornings, others are “owls” and come to life late in the evening when it’s time for the larks to call it a day. I am, of course, exaggerating to make a point, but there is a lot of substance in whether you are a “morning” person or an “evening” person. I would venture to suggest that team formation based on people with complimentary tolerances for time are bound to do better in the long run than those where everyone is of one type.

In this context, I was very interested to read this article in the Wall Street Journal, “The Peak Time For Everything ” by Sue Shellenbarger. Much of it may seem obvious but the message is, do what you do best when you are at your best. There are some activities that most people prefer to do first thing in the morning when they are fresh. Most people become sluggish after the mid day meal. Not a good idea to schedule an important client meeting then. Interestingly, people see social networking as a relief from the daily routine of work and tend to enjoy this activity late in the evenings.

The pressure of work is incessant these days. While driving back home from the City this evening, I was astonished to see the number of people speaking on their cell phones and even texting as they drove their cars in maddening traffic. Are the pressures of time on themĀ  so very severe that they risk life and limb, theirs as well as that of others, in trying to get some work done in the most inappropriate times?

Do you know and use your body clock effectively? How do you manage time or do you let events overcome you and live for the minute? To be more effective in all that you do, I guess it’s important to know yourself andĀ  what you do best when.

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